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Metalman9
M E T A L M A N 9
M E T A L M A N 9
Ph: 204-223-7809
METALMAN9
Ph: 204-223-7809
METALMAN9
Click the date link, then a photo to start larger photo gallery & see descriptions
October 1, 2020 - Sur Le 2
October 3, 2020 - Darwin
October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm
October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St.
October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 1, 2020 - The Homestead on the # 2 October 3, 2020 - Darwin October 3, 2020 - Darwin October 3, 2020 - Darwin October 3, 2020 - Darwin October 3, 2020 - Darwin October 3, 2020 - Darwin October 3, 2020 - Darwin
October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park
October 11, 2020 - St. Norbert Farmer’s Martket
October 16, 2020 - New Bus Stops on Baylor
October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West
October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 18, 2020 - Ryerson School Field West October 16, 2020 - New Bus Stops on Baylor October 16, 2020 - New Bus Stops on Baylor October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 14, 2020 - Foot Bridge off Pliguet St. October 11, 2020 - St. Norbert Farmer's Market October 11, 2020 - St. Norbert Farmer's Market October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 5, 2020 - Happyland Park October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm October 9, 2020 - Two Points Farm
The Homestead on the # 2. Yet another sussesfull and good weather day at Metal Detecting. There's my brother Geatan trying his hand at detecting. "Sur le 2" Or on the 2 as we call it at home. Has to do with the Range and Township numbers. This is an open field on the prairie, far from anything. The buildings disappeared half a century ago or longer. But there's no mistaking were they were. Some concrete pieces, round field stones and tonnes or iron. OK, 5 lbs. worth actually. The nails in the field lined up almost in a row over one given area. The older square type nails are at the bottom right of the main picture with all the finds. Little else was found. Either the people living there had very little or it's so old a site that people lived very independently from canned goods and manufacture items or I completely missed their dump site and any lost items. Of interest is the belt buckle. Non magnetic so I assume cast zinc with a nickel plate... Maybe. The barb wire piece is nice. Naturally It was found at the boundary between neighbouring fields. Next to it on the close up is the only piece of aluminium or non ferrous metal found. This seems unusual and without more information as to who lived there and when, I have no clear answer as to why. Sounds like a winter research project. The deepest item found was the square looking iron plate next to the rock on the main picture. It took a shovel for me to dig it out at 10 - 12 inches deep. And then I found the Rock! Yes "thee" rock... Go ahead, have a second look... real close. And there it is. A clear letter "X". Does X mark the spot? Or is it an ancient early Christian Symbol? A Chi Rho perhaps. And then there's the two Spanish daggers... perhaps that row of nails, square nails, is from the planks of a ship that brought the pirates along with those leg chains and shackles. Yes I see it now. A clear link with Oak Island and buried treasure... That cross on the rock is clearly the Knights Templar. Is it a sign pointing to the cache of treasure? Now only if I could remember which way the X pointed. Sorry, I just couldn't help myself. Too funny. I can just hear my former work mates cringeing. Yes, (Foster) is at it again. A few work mates are on my e-mail list. Well aside for the last little bit... the day was successful. I finally got to detect Le 2.
Coin Haul at Happyland Park. My latest outing was to Happyland Park. It's another spot that I've been egging to get to. The detecting window is quickly closing in with the onset of winter and then it's 5 months of... well... not detecting. I'm still very much learning. And a part of that is determining what I enjoy the most, what sites yield the most interesting items, and where to find these sites that have perhaps not been gone over by other detectorists. I'm hoping to find a spot where I can find coins older than the 1960's and more recent. I've only found 2 older coins to date. Every site has it's particularity and I've been enjoying figuring it all out. History and geography, some intuition and a lot of good luck all combine with this hobby. So... Happyland Park!!!! Did you know that the original Happyland Park in Winnipeg was actually an Amusement Park that opened in 1906 between what is now Dominion St. and Aubrey, south of Portage Ave. It was operated by the American Park Company. It closed in 1914. Check out "Historic Sites of Manitoba" on line. Great info. The Happyland Park that I detected, is in St. Boniface between Marion, Archibald and Prosper Streets. It's a large park so only worked the South East corner. It's also close to a bus stop on Archibald. The park is also home to many large older trees. Old trees and metal detecting work well together. I dug up my largest haul of coins to date from one location. Not in cash value ($2.29) but in sheer quantity of coins found on one hunt. 55 pieces. By one tree, I dug up 5 coins in one hole. My guess is that someone sat there and his or her pocket emptied. Also found in one large old tree was a "Painted Rock".... part of a Winnipeg Art Protect. Ever cool. Always something new to discover. One area along the street curb had been "Filled" with soil from who knows were. This is where I found the clothes line pulley and the cut bits of copper pipe. The oldest coin found, a penny from 1956 was just in an open area. A few jewelry pieces, literally pieces, were found. As were lots of broken metal car parts in one spot, probably from an accident. I will definitely return to Happyland Park. I don't expect quite as many coins again but it's an older park and I don't believe that it's been worked over yet, at least not the area that I was in. There's also a low laying area next to the Seine River that might be interesting as it's old and has not been filled in. But it risks being muddy.
May I suggest enlarging some of the pictures as this will reveal surprising details. Friday, October 9 was a warm, sunny but windy day. The site is in the Letellier area. It is the same location where I found a Sterling silver Maple Leaf brooch. It's were my Dad and some of my aunt's went to school in a one room school. The area was called Two Points as it in the space between two close meanders of the Red River. There once was the school, a grocery store and a black smith shop. There may also have been a wind mill. I hope to find out more information with winter research. While detecting, I had the pleasure of having my brother Micheal drop in for a visit. This field had been worked after harvest and we were able to collect a lot of metal pieces and lots of glass and ceramic shards right of the surface. The large door handle was found by Micheal this way. So.... here are the pictures in two parts. Look for the hinge pin in with the square nails, a watch part, the top of a vehicle motor valve, a tire valve stem, a 22 shell casing, ancient worm holes and mud tracks in sedimentary stone, part of a copper spoon, an engine head piece showing the ignition number sequence ( I think), possibly part of a grain grinding wheel. And the bottom of a very old glass bottle. Incredible irradesance. All this presented to you by a partial # 5. And where's Waldo??? No, no, that's me. Can you find the broken drill bit? How about the screw bolt. These are mostly used on telephone and telegraph poles. Let me know if you recognize some of the other artifacts or know what they might be. I may not be correct on some of these. I must thank Pan and Sid Kroker, archeologists, for their constant and unwavering support with my new hobby and for Pam's expertise in pottery and identifying patterns on shards. Also correctly called "Sherds". The pretty blue flowery design is possibly a Blue Flow print. British. 1880's to 1910's. It is a blurry pattern. The shard with the black writing is actually a raised print to the touch. The manufacturer is George Jones and Sons. Royal Ironstone ware. Made in Staffordshire, England at some time between 1864 and up to 1970. Thank you so much for sharing your research.
Today, I detected around the Market Parking Lot, Bus Stop and Kid’s Play Ground. Found a 1964 Silver Quarter on north side of the water pad in the playground. Bus stop was not good due to construction. Parking lots are all way too hard to dig… packed quarter down.
New Bus Stops… The weather is good so I'm still at it, metal detecting. Or in this case it's more like coin detecting. Can't go wrong with a bus stop apparently. This was the proceeds: $2.68 from two stops along Baylor Ave. close to home in Fort Richmond. Or is that $2.67 and a half. Yes, that penny is completely folded in half. No idea ??? Found a button. A heavy little copper piece and some sort of round, gold colored iron plate and some metal clothes labels. Note the 3rd Nickel in the row... completely copper colored and not at all magnetic like most nickels. It's copper and dated 1988. No coin older than 1972. 5 US pennies found in total.
A piece of the puzzle. I'm sure you've figured it out by now. I'm having a grand old time out here metal detecting. Always something new and interesting to discover. I had a few hours to kill yesterday before supper, the weather was rather cool but sunny so it's off to one of my favorite hunting grounds. It takes about 5 minuits to walk there from home. The Ryerson school yard. I can't complain that I'm not finding any jewelry. The copper plated bangle, and yes, slightly rusted in spots, is after all "Jewelry". Does Tariff Classification # 7117.19.00.90 ring a bell with anyone? This is the 3rd piece of "Bling" found on this location. There's a row of mature trees and a back lane on the west side of the school yard. It's an area where people stand to watch a ball game or soccer match. People drop stuff. I find it... decades later. It's where I found the Mundelein Soccer Pin and the small Sterling Silver Ring back on August 27. Both Loonies featured were found together. Both are dated 1996. There was a two foot "trail" of about 7 or 8 coins all in a row, all dated from the mid 70's. Got to love it !!! And that piece of puzzle! If you've ever lost that one piece of a puzzle, well looks like I found it. Or.... all I've got to do now is find the other 999 pieces. Lol. I found 2 keys. I did look around for a Chrysler vehicle... I could have gone for a joy ride but I didn't see one. The other key is for a padlock of sorts. What interests me is the heavy iron pointy thing with threads at the top end. I think it might be part of a tool... maybe. I could use help identifying this thing. Any guesses? Also found was a lot of aluminum. My aluminum bucket is quickly filling with bottle caps, shredded cans, a used tube of ointment, and wire strips to tie chain link fencing. Tess tells me that the feather is a sign that someone is watching over me. A soothing thought. I find one or two every time that I go out detecting. Well its supper time and back home I go. Another fine outing.
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Memory Lane… So today, I went out metal detecting with a friend of 45 years plus. Mark Legal. Mark and I are former residents of Le Petit Seminaire. This was a boarding home for young boys from mainly rural Manitoba. It was to provide access to a more formal French high school education. And as it was run by the Diocese of St.Boniface, the hope had been to guide young boys towards priesthood. It was a well organized, well run and well structured environment. With 40 or so kids from grades 8 to 12... well we had a lot of fun and some serious study in between. Hockey, canoe trips, outings and so on created successfully adults. Mark and I have been friends since day one. Today, for the first time in about 40 years, we went back to retrace our steps and do a bit of metal detecting in the process. There used to be a foot bridge that crossed the Seine River. It started at the end of Plinguet St. and ended on property owned by the Weststeel Rosco Co. on the west side of the river. There then used to be a paved foot path that took you onto Rue Desautels and onto school, College de St. Boniface. We walked this path 4 times a day.... after all we had to come home for lunch. Today.... the bridge is long gone. The paved foot path is barely discernable in a few spots that is not covered by soil and undergrowth. We actually had difficulty determining the exact location of the bridge itself as no piers exist and the trees..... wow the trees. How they have taken over. I don't know for sure when the bridge was removed or why but I assume it's in the range of 25 to 30 years ago. A lifetime. Mark quite rightly said.... we won't be here in another 40 years to see those changes. Metal detecting was fun and new to Mark but not overly fruitful. The triangular piece of thick aluminum was Mark's first find. You detected it... you dig it. Or so the teasing goes. Great job. Found were a huge amount of pop cans. Some as deep as 5 inches in. The area is a wooded river bank. All around are concrete blocks and curbs and sidewalk pieces that was used as fill way back when. The entire area consists of 20 or so feet thick of this sort of fill. Numerous homeless people have come, set up camp and gone, though a few still live along the banks. A part of the area has also been used for illegal dumping. We found a piano of all things. I did pick up a heavy lead pipe and copper wire. Now in my scrap buckets. And this big rock.... looks like volcanic pumice but it's probably the residue or clinker from a coal furnace or boiler. Last is this old brick building. Very Old. No street near it as it just sits in an empty space near the river. Funny how after living in the area and walking close to it for 5 years.... neither one of us had ever noticed it before. Sounds like more winter research. And here I thought that I might get bored being retired. Enjoy the pictures. Memory is a funny thing. How quickly things around us change and how we think we remember things and places. It was a pleasure to walk down these paths. Amazing how far we've come and then I look forward to what is waiting around the bend.
Darwin Manitoba Darwin Manitoba was a railway stop on the Canadian National’s main line. It was approx. 15 or so kilometers east of Whitemouth off of Hwy. 44. There is a dirt road that leads you to the rail lines where Darwin once stood. It hosted two houses and a railway platform of sorts. I found Darwin while looking over some old topographical maps that I had bought as a kid. The newer maps don’t even show it anymore. I guess with due cause as there is very little left on the site that would even hint at there ever being houses there. The only indication was the well and hand pump. Only problem is that the pump handle sits at about 8 feet up. Swamp has reclaimed the area, small trees grow every which way making difficult to metal detect and very little was found. Brunswick Sardines anyone? We did have occasion to cross paths with a few deer hunters though. So if you out in the bush during deer hunting season, make sure to wear something bright and preferably orange.